• St. Louis Researchers Are Major Recipients of NIH Grants

    Jun 05, 2017

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the major source of government funding for health and biosciences research.   Greater St. Louis received a total of $439 million in awards in 2016.  Most of the funding awarded was received by area universities.  Washington University in St. Louis is one of the largest recipients of NIH funding with $407 million, followed by Saint Louis University with $21 million. 

    Many private research organizations also saw funding growth including William D. Shannon Consulting, LLC, Intact Genomics, Inc., and ISTO Technologies.  ISTO Technologies’ award jumped by nearly 55 percent over the past year.  

    Summary of National Institutes of Health Funding to Organizations in the St. Louis, MO-IL MSA

    Organization

    2015

    2016

    Non-Profits, Non-University Total

    $300,000

    $330,000

    Private Companies Total

    $8,169,631

    $7,939,697

    University Recipients Total

    $399,438,950

    $431,527,207

    Total

    $407,938,581

    $439,796,904

    Source: “NIH Awards by Location & Organization” National Institutes of Health, 2016.

    Funding has remained relatively stable throughout the past decade, with a $31 million increase in awards from 2015 to 2016.  An upturn in the amounts received by universities was key to this growth.  While annual awards can vary depending on policy changes and funds available, the health and biosciences industry in St. Louis has sustained its position as a major U.S. research center.  The magnitude of these awards highlights St. Louis’s success in the investment and cultivation of some of the region’s most promising industries.  The St. Louis Regional Chamber’s economic development team shares in the commitment to growing the health and biosciences industries.  In doing so, we are working to build on our economic strengths by focusing on the economic clusters where we already have experienced success and have the potential for global growth.